RESEARCH

Projects Directly Related to My Playful Resistance & Computationally Supported Countercultures Research Focuses

COUNTERSPACE GAMES FOR BLACK, INDIGENOUS, AND OTHER WOMEN OF COLOR STEM STUDENTS

September 2019 - Present

We are co-designing games with Black, Indigenous, and other Women of Color studying STEM. This project operates under the idea that practicing joy and interdependence can combat oppression as personal playful methods of resistance and that this can be facilitated by counterspaces (or spaces for support of marginalized groups at the periphery of a dominant culture). This research will explore designs of playful counterspaces as games with BIWOC in STEM to combat experiences of oppression in STEM culture.

Counterspace Games for BIWOC STEM Students Poster.jpg

AR PLAYABLE THEATRE ROSENSTRASSE: WE CHOOSE EACH OTHER

January 2020 - June 2020

To explore the future of storytelling in AR, Team MemoiAR iteratively designed an AR adaptation of the award-winning game Rosenstrasse: an analog immersive tabletop roleplaying game that explores Jewish-Aryan marriages in WWII Berlin. This AR adaptation, Rosenstrasse: We Choose Each Other, preserves major themes and one dyad’s storyline of growing love and sustained personal resistance from the original game while AR extends the original live, interactive narrative experience, described in this paper as playable theatre. This paper analyzes key moments of R:WCEO and presents autoethnographic descriptions of the first author’s play experiences to illustrate design strategies developed by MemoiAR coauthors. These designs to facilitate narrative immersion, foster player interpersonal connections, and support physical roleplay enactments produce a compelling AR playable theatre experience. To conclude, this paper presents transferable insights, drawn from the presented design strategies, for the design of immersive, technologically-mediated playable theatre experiences.

A player writes "I Love You" on the screen of an iPad with their fingertip

LAB COUNTERCULTURE

September 2019 - January 2020

While academic research culture varies across schools, disciplines, and individual labs, the material and mental well-being of both graduate students and faculty are often negatively impacted by systemic factors in academia. Here we unpack these patterns in order to counter the narrative that individualistic solutions can bring about change. We illustrate how focus on quantitative outcomes, perfectionism, competition, time scarcity, power dynamics, bias towards maintaining the status quo, and financial stress contribute to negative lab culture. We describe specific, concrete, and actionable practices we institute in our lab to counter these systemic factors. We end by opening the conversation to other researchers to examine and counter toxic lab culture to promote supportive, inclusive, and ethical research. [TL;DR blog post]  (Photo by Mario Gogh on Unsplash)

people work together on computers in a meeting room at night